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HomeDietetics and Human NutritionResearch2009 - 2010 Undergraduate Research in Nutrition and Food Science › Correlation between beverage intake patterns and body weight.

2009 - 2010 Undergraduate Research in Nutrition and Food Science

Correlation between beverage intake patterns and body weight.

Erika Contasti

Erika Contasti

Abstract

Background:  Two-thirds of American adults are overweight or obese.   Lifestyle choices including diet and physical activity are prime contributors.  Preliminary research has shown that beverage choice is one factor contributing to obesity, particularly consumption of sugar-sweetened, high-fructose corn syrup containing, drinks. 

Methods:  To investigate the correlation between beverage intake and body mass index (BMI) a study was conducted in 190 undergraduate students at the University of Kentucky (average age 19.84 ± 1.68 years). 

Results:  79 males (average BMI 24.61± 3.14 kg/m2) and 111 females (average BMI 22.38 ± 3.28 kg/m2) completed the survey. The males who answered that they drank regular soda daily had an average BMI of 24.02± 3.18 kg/m2 while those who did not had an average BMI of 25.04± 3.08 kg/m2. The females who answered that they drank regular soda daily had an average BMI of 22.55 ± 3.93 kg/m2 while those who did not had an average BMI of 22.35 ± 3.08 kg/m2. The males who answered that they drank diet soda daily had an average BMI of 27.02 ± 3.67 kg/m2 while the males who did not had an average BMI of 24.05± 2.74 kg/m2 (p<0.05). The females who answered that they drank diet soda daily reported an average BMI of 22.58 ±2.76 kg/m2 while those who did not had an average BMI of 22.26± 3.58kg/m2. Females that consumed milk daily had an average BMI of 22.23± 4.58 kg/m2 while those who did not had an average BMI of 21.74± 4.29 kg/m2.  There was no significant difference between the BMIs of both males and females based on the different amounts of water consumed.

Conclusions:  Most of this data found no significant differences between beverage intake and BMI.  The only correlation found (p<0.05) was between males that consume diet soda and males that do not consume diet soda.  However, further research needs to be completed on this topic to better educate college students on beverage choices. 

 
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