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HomeDietetics and Human NutritionResearch2011-2012 Undergraduate Research in Nutrition and Food Science › Correlation between Organic Food Intake and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

2011-2012 Undergraduate Research in Nutrition and Food Science

Correlation between Organic Food Intake and Fruit and Vegetable Consumption
Michele Kirn
Michele Kirn
Abstract

Background: Organic food is a rapidly growing trend around the world. Many people are turning toward organic foods because they are becoming more aware of what they are eating. Most food is offered organically but fruit and vegetables are the most consumed groups of organic food. There is limited research on those who choose organic food and if they consume more fruit and vegetables than those who do not eat organic food.

Methods: Data was collected from 123 young adults (103 females and 20 males) ranging between ages 18 to 31 years old in Kentucky. The study design was cross sectional using self-reporting surveys were distributed online via social networking websites and email. Most subjects were students from the University of Kentucky. The survey recorded the participants’ organic food consumption (how much) and frequency (how often), where they shop, their fruit and vegetable intake, and why they either choose or didn’t choose organic food.  Descriptive statistics were found.

Results: The results concluded that 52.1% of the subjects food consumption consisted of <25% organic food, 18.4% consumed >26% and 29.4% consumed no organic food. The main reason (40.27%) for choosing organic food was because it is healthier. The main reason (39.35%) for not choosing organic food was because it is too expensive. There is a strong correlation between fruit intake and organic food consumption (r=0.81 and p<0.001). There is a strong correlation between vegetable intake and organic food consumption (r=0.81 and p<0.001).

Conclusion: The results suggest that young adults who consume more organic food do in fact consume more fruit and vegetables than those who do not consume organic food or consume very little.  

 
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Copyright 2011, Questions/Comments - Last Updated: March 13 2013 14:51:04