Digital Imaging and Microscope Information

from the

UK Extension Plant Pathology Group

John Hartman, Donald Hershman, Kenny Seebold, Paul Vincelli, Paul Bachi, Julie Beale

Contact: Paul Bachi updated November 16, 2012

Table of Contents
Reason for this Document
Use of Digital Images in Solving Plant Problems
Digital Imaging Overview
Digital Imaging Product Information: Where to get it?
Tips on Buying Smartly
Tips on Buying a Digital Camera
Use your digital camera as a video camera
Tips on Digital Photography
Tips on Buying a Flatbed Scanner
Microscopic Equipment for Plant Disease Diagnosis
General Dissecting Microscope Specifications
Specifications for Dissecting Microscope Systems
Specifications for a Trinocular Compound Microscope
All-In-One Digital Microscopes

 

 


Reason for this Document

County agents often ask our opinion on digital cameras, digital equipment, and microscopes. In an effort to make this information available to everyone and to keep down the time it takes to answer individual requests, we decided to put the information on our web site.

We will do our best to keep this document updated with the latest information available.

Listing of products or vendors implies no endorsement by the University of Kentucky nor its representatives. Criticism of products not listed is neither implied nor intended.



(back to Table of Contents)


Use of Digital Images in Solving Plant Problems

We believe that, in a majority of cases, images are not a substitute for live plant specimens. The use of digital images of plant problems is best viewed as an aid in "consultation" about a problem situation. Pictures should enhance telephone, postal, and e-mail consultation efforts between the specialist and county agent, for example, and in some cases, could lead to a tentative diagnosis. We believe digital images used in diagnosis need to be viewed as a supplement to a specimen, "just another tool" for the diagnostician. The phrase "distance diagnosis" has caused problems in slanting expectations as to the veracity of results obtained when using images as the only "specimen".

The Plant Disease Diagnostic Laboratory has completed five full years, as of late 2009, working with the "Digital Consulting System", a web-based system for County Extension Offices and Extension Specialists. The "Digital Consulting System" was created in cooperation with the UK College of Agriculture's Ag Communication Services Department.
The images can be used to help determine how and where best to collect samples for submission to the laboratory, as well as general or specific advice on a wide range of topics.
The system is also useful for Homeland Security purposes because the topic possibilities are not limited to plants and because specialists in other states can be brought into the system as a consultant on a case-by-case basis.



(back to Table of Contents)


Digital Imaging Overview

A digital image can be used in print, e-mail, electronic or 35mm slide presentations, or on Web sites. You can digitize existing photographs with a flatbed scanner or a digital camera if you are good at it and your camera will allow close ups. A flatbed scanner or dedicated 35mm slide scanner can digitize 35mm slides. A flatbed scanner can also capture a usable image of a 3-dimensional object. Of course, digital cameras can take images of all kinds of objects, indoors and outdoors.



(back to Table of Contents)


Digital Imaging Product Information:
Where to get it?

Local businesses and stores, catalogs, and Web sites, are good places for product specifications and other information.

Here's a selected list of some businesses specializing in digital imaging technology.

Computers4sure 800-266-7883 http://www.computers4sure.com
Good information and selection of all kinds of computers, software, printers, scanners, graphics and design software, digital cameras, etc.

DaLite http://www.da-lite.com/products/
A web site for video screens. See the list of "Links" at the right of this page for a guide to "Selecting the Right Screen and Screen Surface" as well as other helpful information.

Digital Photography Review http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/
Digital camera reviews; a good balance of detailed and practical information

Digital Camera Resource http://www.dcresource.com/
Detailed camera reviews, etc.

Camera labs http://www.cameralabs.com/
Digital camera reviews; a good balance of detailed and practical information

igo.com 1-888-205-0093 http://www.igo.com
Specializing in Mobile Computer Technology plus 1000s of Batteries for laptops, cell phones, camcorders; AC adapters and chargers, world-travel voltage adapters, auto adapters and other tools for the mobile professional.

LCD Projector Bulbs 1-886-523-2852 http://www.lcdprojectorbulbs.com/

Mobile Planet 1-800-675-2638 http://www.mobileplanet.com/
Specializing in Mobile Computer Technology and related items.

My Simon http://www.mysimon.com/index.jhtml
Compare products and prices from around the Web.

PC Connection/GovConnection http://www.pcconnection.com
Good information source for desktop and notebook computers, software, printers, scanners, digital cameras, graphics and design software, digital video products, monitors, video cards and storage products.

PriceGrabber http://www.pricegrabber.com/
Pricing for on-line shopping.

ProjectorPlace 1-888-248-0675
http://www.projectorplace.com/projectors/projector-comparisons.asp
Compare projector specifications and price,
3 at a time.

UK eBuy
http://www.uky.edu/Purchasing/ebuy/periph.php
Digital cameras and all kinds of stuff from UK's purchasing portal.

 

 



(back to Table of Contents)


Tips on Buying Smartly

See the following article on the PC World web site
Resolutions for Smart Buyers
(12 tips for avoiding rip-offs, scams, and other shopping hazards in 2000 and still valid today.)

Survey from PC World dated November 27, 2007
on the Most and Least Reliable Brands
http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,139958/article.html#

 

 

 

(back to Table of Contents)


Tips on Buying a Digital Camera

Topics Camera picks
Resolution

Getting digital images into your computer

cameras having Microscope adapters
Lenses  
Minimum focus range Image output to TV "County Agent" cameras
Picture storage medium Power source Link to camera manuals on-line (pdf format)
Picture storage
on the go
Included software package

 

http://pcworld.com/article/id,125645-page,1-c,digitalcameras/article.html
help with what you need to know to buy a digital camera.

http://www.shortcourses.com/guide/
a short course in choosing a digital camera

http://www.steves-digicams.com/digi-dictionary.html
a very good "digicam" dictionary of technical terms

Side by Side comparisons:
"Digital Photography Review" website
a list of features of the cameras selected

 

Resolution:
The higher the number, the more pixels but not necessarily a better picture.

Designation
Resolution Standards
Number of Pixels (million)
QXGA 2048 x 1536 3.2
QSXGA 2560 x 1920 5
QUXGA 3200 x 2400 7.7

You will find other numbers below, between, and above these standard resolutions. The resolution you need for a decent picture for printing depends on the size of the print; the larger the print size, the larger the resolution needed. Most cameras with a high resolution can also take images at lower resolutions. If not, you will need to use image editing software to reduce the resolution of your images for efficient use on a website or for e-mail.
The resolutions in the table above are in the standard 4:3 format but with the newer widescreen TVs, the soon to be standard format is 16:9 (which are usually designated by the letter "W" at the beginning of the designation, e.g. WQXGA 2560x1600). Most newer cameras can take images in both the 4:3 and 16:9 formats.

Lenses:
The better cameras come with an optical lens that has auto focusing. Some of these optical lenses also have a macro feature for close-up work. Many of these optical lenses come with a zoom feature. The best lens is an optical lens with zoom and auto focusing throughout the zoom range. Digital zooming is done electronically by which the camera estimates what the image will look like when zoomed in. This digital estimate is of a lower resolution than the non-digitally zoomed original image. That is why it is better to have an optical zoom lens which uses the lens' optics to zoom in on a subject and preserves the capability of taking an image at the camera's highest resolution .

Minimum focus range:
The smaller or closer to the object you can focus the better for small or close-up work. The better cameras have a minimum range of about 4" or smaller. Some cameras can get much closer but getting light between the lens and the subject is difficult.

Picture storage medium:
Most cameras store pictures on memory cards which slip into the camera: need more storage space for more pictures just pop in another card like you would another roll of film. There are several types of memory cards. Some cameras have internal memory only which limits the number of pictures you can take at one time until they must be downloaded and erased from the camera so more pictures can be taken. Some have both internal memory and memory card capability.
See this article for information on long-term storage of digital images.


also...Picture storage on the go:

Most of these devices are portable, battery operated, mass storage devices for digital cameras, MP3 players or any multimedia hardware that uses removable flash memory cards.
See more information at Image storage devices.

Getting digital images into your computer:
Many of the older cameras have a serial port for output and come with the cable to go between the camera and the serial port on your computer. Many newer cameras have a USB port (USB 1.1 or USB 2.0 better) or even a FireWire port for output and come with the cable to go between the camera and the USB port or FireWire Port on your computer. Most newer computers have USB ports.

A memory card reader is basically an external drive which connects to the parallel or USB port on your computer. Put your memory card in and the device will download the images to your computer.

Image output to TV:
This is an especially nice feature if you are not near a computer but have a TV which has a video input jack. You can view the pictures on TV by running through them as you would on the LCD view panel on the back of the camera.

 

Power source:
All cameras use batteries and most have standard or optional AC adapters. Many use AA-size batteries but some come with a lithium ion battery. Of the AA-size batteries the best would be NiMH, followed by NiCad, Alkaline, and then Standard. Check to see whether your camera can take NiMH or NiCad batteries before purchasing them. A camera that comes with rechargeable batteries and charger is a nice touch because digital cameras are power hungry, especially if you use the color LCD view panel a lot.
Best Rechargeable Batteries and Chargers of 2011.

 

Included software package:
All cameras have some type of software, usually the company's own, which is used to download, save, delete pictures from the camera.


Which digital camera to buy?

http://pcworld.com/article/id,125645-page,1-c,digitalcameras/article.html
help with what you need to know to buy a digital camera.

http://www.shortcourses.com/guide/
a short course in choosing a digital camera

http://www.steves-digicams.com/digi-dictionary.html
a very good "digicam" dictionary of technical terms

Side by Side comparisons:
"Digital Photography Review" website
a list of features of the cameras selected

 

 

***"County Agent" cameras***
Fixed lens cameras only, not Digital SLR
(click for Digital SLR camera reviews and/or Digital SLR camera/gear reviews) Also see the new Micro Four Thirds camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_gf1-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Panasonic_Lumix_DMC_GF1/index.shtml
Panasonic releases DMC-GF1 firmware update version 1.1
http://www.dcviews.com/press/panasonic-gf1-1.htm)

Martin Microscope also sells a Microscope adapter for SLR cameras.

 

Wet weather options...
See 6 Wet-weather camera comparison at
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/Q311waterproofcompactgrouptest/page12.asp
Fujifilm FinePix XP30
Olympus Tough TG-810
Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS3
Pentax Optio WG-1 GPS
Ricoh PX
Sony Cyber-shot TX10

Winners: Panasonic Lumix DMC-TS3 (Gold Award, ~$299)
and Sony Cyber-shot TX10 (Silver Award, ~$309)

...provide all-weather protection.

----------------------------------------------

 

Standard (not Wet-Weather) Digital Camera Selection Criteria:
-at least a 4x optical lens
-reviewed favorably by at least one of the main digital camera websites
listed here :

1- http://www.dpreview.com/ (Digital Photography Review)
(highly detailed information)
2- http://www.dcresource.com/ (Digital Camera Resource)
(a good balance of detailed and practical information)
3- http://www.cameralabs.com/ (Camera Labs)
(a good balance of detailed and practical information)
4- http://www.photographyblog.com/ (Photography Blog)
(a good balance of detailed and practical information)
5- http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/ (Digital Camera Review)
(a good balance of detailed and practical information)

6- http://www.steves-digicams.com/ (Steve's Digicams)
(basically good reviews)

[Cameras listed from lowest to highest price ~$119 to ~$799.]

Budget Camera Shootout (July 2010)

Top Picks = Canon PowerShot SD1300 IS (scarce)
----------------
and Pentax Optio H90 (~$109)
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/2010-budget-camera-shootout?page=0,10

 

Canon PowerShot A2300 IS (~$129)
Lens: 5 optical, 28-140mm, no optical image stabilization
Resolution (max): 4608 x 3456 (16.0 megapixels), 4608 x 2592 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 2.7 inch/230,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 3.0 cm
ISO range: 80-1600
Movies (max): 1280 x 720-25fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_A2300/index.shtml

 

Canon PowerShot A3400 IS (~$149)
Lens: 5 optical, 28-140mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4608 x 3456 (16.0 megapixels), 4608 x 2592 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/230,000; touchscreen
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 3.0 cm
ISO range: 80-1600
Movies (max): 1280 x 720-25fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews:
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_A3400_IS/verdict.shtml

 

Canon PowerShot SD4500 IS Digital ELPH (~$179) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 10x optical, 36-360mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 3648 x 2736 (10.0 megapixels), 3648 x 2048 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/230,000 (widescreen 16:9)
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 3 cm
ISO range: 125-3200
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080 (HD 24 fps)
Memory: no built-in memory or card included
; can use SD/SDHC, MMC/MMC+, and HC MMC+ cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_SD4500_IS_IXUS_1000_HS/

 

Sony Cyber-Shot DCS-HX5V(~$179)
Lens: 10x optical, 25-250mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 3648 x 2736 (10.2 megapixels), 3648 x 2056 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/230,400
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 5.0 cm
ISO range: 125-3200
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-60fps
Memory: 45MB internal; Memory Stick Duo/Pro Duo/PRO HG-Duo, optional SD/SDHC
GPS built-in
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://cameralabs.com/reviews/Sony_Cyber-shot_DSC_HX5/

 

Canon PowerShot SX150 IS (~$199) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 12 optical, 28-336mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4320 x 3240 (14.1 megapixels), 4320 x 2432 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/230,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 1.0 cm
ISO range: 80-1600 (3200 at 3 megapixels)
Movies (max): 1280 x 720-30fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: 2-AA rechargeable batteries included
Reviews: http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_SX150_IS/index.shtml
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_powershot_sx150_is_review/

 

Canon PowerShot 310 HS Digital ELPH (~$219) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 8x optical, 28-224mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/461,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 3.0 cm
ISO range: 100-3200
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_ELPH_310_HS_IXUS_230_HS/


Canon PowerShot 110 HS Digital ELPH (~$229) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 5x optical, 24-120mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4608 x 3456 (16.1 megapixels), 4608 x 2592 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/461,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 3.0 cm
ISO range: 100-3200
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=4966&review=canon+powershot+elph+110+hs


Olympus SP-620 UZ (~$229)
Lens: 21x optical, 25-525mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4608 x 3456 (16 megapixels), 4608 x 2592 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/230,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 1.0 cm
ISO range: 80-1600
Movies (max): 1280 x 720-30fps
Memory: 59MB built-in; uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.
Batteries/Charger: 4-AA batteries included; use recharables and a charger
Reviews: http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/olympus_sp_620uz_review/

 

Canon PowerShot SX240 HS (~$299) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 20x optical, 25-500mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/461,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 2.0 inch
ISO range: 100-3200 (3200 P mode)
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.
Batteries/Charger:
lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews:
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_SX240_HS_SX260_HS/index.shtml



Canon PowerShot SX260 HS (~$349) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 20x optical, 25-500mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/461,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 2.0 inch
ISO range: 100-3200 (3200 P mode)
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.
GPS built-in
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canon-powershot-sx260-hs
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_sx260hs-review
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_powershot_sx260_hs_review/


Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS20 (~$349) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 20x optical, 24-480mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4320 x 3240 (14.1 megapixels), 4320 x 2432 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/460,000 (touchscreen)
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 3 cm
ISO range: 80-3200 (1600-6400 high sensitivity mode)
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-60p
Memory: 12MB built-in, takes SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
GPS built-in and maps
Batteries/Charger:
lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_zs20-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Panasonic_Lumix_DMC_ZS20_TZ30/ http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/panasonic_lumix_dmc_tz30_review/
http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=4947&review=panasonic+lumix+zs20
[Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS15 (~$279) (CMOS sensor)
No GPS, 12.1MP, 16x optical lens, movies 1920x1080-60i, etc.
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-lumix-dmc-zs15-tz25
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_zs15-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Panasonic_Lumix_DMC_ZS15_TZ25/
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/panasonic_lumix_dmc_tz25_review/]

 

 

Canon PowerShot SX40 IS (~$399) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 35x optical, 24-840mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 2.7 inch/230,000; fully articulated
Optical Viewfinder: No, viewfinder is electronic
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 0 cm (not a typo)
ISO range: 80-1600 (3200 option)
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.
Batteries/Charger:
lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_sx40-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_SX40_HS/index.shtml
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_powershot_sx40_hs_review/

 

Canon PowerShot S100 (~$429) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 5x optical, 24-120mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/461,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 3 cm
ISO range: 80-6400
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps w/sound
Memory:
uses SD/SDHC/SDXC cards.
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canons100/
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_s100-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_S100/index.shtml
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_powershot_s100_review/

 

 

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ150 (~$439) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 24x optical, 25-600mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2672 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/460,000 (articulated)
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 1 cm
ISO range: 100-3200 (1600-6400 high sensitivity mode)
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-60p
Memory: 70MB built-in, takes SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger:
lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonicdmcfz150

 

 

Sony Cyber-Shot DCS-HX200V(~$469)
Lens: 30x optical, 27-810mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4896 x 3672 (18.2 megapixels), 4896 x 2752 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/921,600 (tilting)
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 1.0 cm
ISO range: 100-12800
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-60fps
Memory: 105MB internal; SD/SDHC/SDXC, Memory Stick Duo/Pro Duo/Pro-HG Duo
GPS built-in and compass
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/sony/dsc_hx200v-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Sony_Cyber-shot_DSC_HX200V/
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/sony_cybershot_dsc_hx200v_review/

 

 

Canon PowerShot G12 (~$469)
Lens: 5x optical, 28-140mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 3648 x 2736 (10 megapixels), 3648 x 2048 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 2.8 inch/461,000 (fully articulated)
Optical Viewfinder: Yes
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 1 cm
ISO range: 80-3200; 6400 and 12800 at 2.5 megapixels.
Movies (max): 1280 x 720-24fps
Memory:
can use SD/SDHC, MMC/MMC+, and HC MMC+ cards.
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_g12-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_G12/
http://www.steves-digicams.com/camera-reviews/canon/powershot-g12/canon-powershot-g12-review.html

Canon PowerShot G15(~$499) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 5x optical, 28-140mm (F1.8-2.8), optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4000 x 3000 (12.1 megapixels), 4000 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/922,000 (fixed)
Optical Viewfinder: Yes
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 1 cm
ISO range: 80-12800.
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
R
eviews: http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_g15-review

 


Olympus XZ-1 (~$479)
Lens: 4x optical, 28-112mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 3648 x 2736 (10 megapixels), 3648 x 2056 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/614,000; OLED
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 0.4 inch
ISO range: 100-3200
Movies (max): 1280 x 720-30fps
Memory:
55MB built-in; uses SD/SDHC, MMC/MMC+, and HC MMC+ cards.
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/OlympusXZ1/
http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=4689&review=olympus+xz1

 

Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX7 (~$499) (CMOS sensor)
Lens: 3.8x optical, 24-90mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 3648 x 2736 (10.1 megapixels), 3968 x 2232 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/920,000
Optical Viewfinder: No
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: to within 1 cm
ISO range: 80-6400 (12800 with boost)
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-60p
Memory: 70MB built-in, takes SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger:
lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-lumix-dmc-lx7/14

 

Canon PowerShot G1 X(~$799) (large 1.5 inch/4:3 sensor)
Lens: 4x optical, 28-112mm, optical image stabilized
Resolution (max): 4352 x 3264 (14.3 megapixels), 4352 x 2248 (16:9)
LCD display size/pixels: 3.0 inch/922,000 (articulated)
Optical Viewfinder: Yes
Auto Focus (AF) assist lamp: Yes
Macro: 20 cm (not great for macro photography)
ISO range: 100-12800
Movies (max): 1920 x 1080-24fps
Memory:
can use SD/SDHC/SDXC cards
Batteries/Charger: lithium-ion battery and charger included
Reviews: http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canong1x/
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/powershot_g1x-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Canon_PowerShot_G1_X/index.shtml
http://www.photographyblog.com/reviews/canon_powershot_g1_x_review/
http://www.digitalcamerareview.com/default.asp?newsID=4950&review=canon+powershot+g1x

 


(click for Digital SLR camera reviews and/or Digital SLR camera/gear reviews) Also see the new Micro Four Thirds camera Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_gf1-review
http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/Panasonic_Lumix_DMC_GF1/index.shtml
Panasonic releases DMC-GF1 firmware update version 1.1
http://www.dcviews.com/press/panasonic-gf1-1.htm)

Martin Microscope also sells a Microscope adapter for SLR cameras.

*** cameras having Microscope adapters...
Most consumer point-and-shoot digital cameras no longer have lens filter threads to which to attach a microscope adapter.
For a list of some adapters for some older cameras, see
http://www.martinmicroscope.com/MMbyCamera.htm


Adapters for several Canon PowerShot and Nikon CoolPix models,
see Zarf Enterprises.
Adapters for many cameras specifically to fit Meiji microscopes.

 

[Note: for Diagnostic Laboratories that want a digital camera dedicated to microscopy only,
See Martin Microscope's Digital Imaging page
for camera adapters http://www.martinmicroscope.com/MMbyCamera.htm
for phototube adapters http://www.martinmicroscope.com/Phototubes.htm
See Nikon Dedicated Digital Cameras for Microscopy

See Olympus Dedicated Digital Cameras for Microscopy
See Biocompare's Dedicated Color Digital Microscopy Cameras
See Olympus - Digital Imaging in Optical Microscopy
]


--- Please contact your UK District Extension Information Technology Contact (DEITC) if you need help in deciding which options for moving digital images from a digital camera to your computer(s) will be compatible with your county's equipment.
Erica Burchett - District 1 - 859/257-3335 ext. 332
David Niece - District 2 - 606/666-2438 ext. 226
Rick Hayes - District 3 - 859/257-3335 ext. 554
Clavin Groves - District 4 - 859/257-3335 ext. 559
Belinda Williams - District 5 - 606/677-6184
John Johnson - District 6 - 270/365-7541 ext. 296
Rich Phelps - District 7 - 270/365-7541 ext. 276

(back to Table of Contents)


Use your digital camera as a video camera

For a Beginner's Guide to Digital Cameras and Video see
http://www.dpreview.com/learn/?/Guides/hd_beginners_guide_01.htm

You can use you digital camera as a video camera by using the "Video Out" port on the digital camera. Your camera likely has a "Video Out" port and if so, it came with a cable to go from your camera to a TV or LCD Projector. This can aid in showing small objects to a large audience at one time (click to see image for explanation - 32KB).

Click to see how the camera and projector are hooked together - 68KB.Note: Most digital cameras shut down if they have not been used for a specific length of time so do not be alarmed if the images goes blank. You will need to turn the digital camera back on.

(back to Table of Contents)


Tips on Digital Photography

See http://www.shortcourses.com
for shortcourses on all aspects of Digital Photography,"Learn Digital Photography" from Digital Photography Review, orfor tips on digital or any type of photography also talk to
Steve Patton spatton@uky.edu 859/257-3129
or
Matt Barton mbarton@uky.edu 859/257-4736
(back to Table of Contents)


Tips on Buying a Flatbed Scanner

What to look for in a flatbed/document scanner. (Consumersearch)
See this site for Capturing a usable image from a 3-dimensional object.

From the Plant Diagnostic Information System:
Taking Diagnostic Images:

If you have to take a digital image in the field, use a digital camera. If you have the option to take the physical sample to your office, always use a scanner. Scanners give the best digital images for diagnostics. The high resolution, color definition, focus, and controlled lighting guarantee a sharp image.
Minimum Recommended Features:
Optical Scan Resolution 1200 dpi (dots/inch)
Color Depth 48 bits
Shopping for a Scanner:
When it comes to scanners you really get what you pay for but they are getting better with lower cost, all the time. Scanners offered by name brand companies often have superior tech support. When shopping, look for scanners that offer USB connections. Pay close attention to the number of seconds required for the preview and final scans.
(back to Table of Contents)


Microscopic Equipment for Plant Disease Diagnosis

Equipment Based on Level of Expertise/Education

EquipmentExpertise/Education Magnification/Use
Hand Lensnot familiar with diseases caused by fungi and have not had any training in microbiology ~5x - 20x Field/Lab use

Determine fungal growth yes/no

Insect injury to plants

Dissecting Microscopefamiliar with diseases caused by fungi but have not had training in microbiology ~4x - 70x Lab use

ID fungal structures/spores

Insect injury to plants

Compound Microscopefamiliar with plant disease causing microorganisms and have had training in microbiology ~40x - 1000x Lab use

ID fungi to genus/speciesID bacteria yes/no

ID viruses (inclusion bodies)?

How to use a Microscope (Basic Microscopy Skills):
See
http://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/intropp/LabExercises/Pages/Microscopes.aspx

Equipment for use with Dissecting Microscope:

Dissecting kit - scalpel, dissecting with blades
forceps, dissecting
needles, teasing straight
lens paper

Equipment for use with Compound microscope:
Dissecting kit - scalpel, dissecting with blades
forceps, dissecting
needles, teasing straight
lens paper
Dropper bottles, square 2 fl oz capacity (for water and staining fluid)
microscope slides, plain, glass 3 x 1 inch
microscope cover glasses, 18 x 18 mm
See listings from catalogs or web sites of various vendors. Also consider the purchase of used microscopes: are often handled in quantity by major microscope brand distributors as part of trade-in policies. You might also check pawn shops, microscope repair services, and small scientific equipment suppliers.

References for aid in diagnosing plant diseases:
PPA-41 "Fundamental Principles of Plant Pathology for Agricultural Producers"

Principles of Diagnostic Techniques in Plant Pathology, 1993. R.T.V. Fox. CAB International. ISBN 0 85198 740 0
Available from Arizona Press, 1230 North Park Ave. Tucson, AZ 85719 $36.00.

The Plant Disease Clinic and Field Diagnosis of Abiotic Diseases, 1997. M.C. Shurtleff and C.W. Averre III. APS Press. ISBN 0-89054-217-1 Item No. 42171 $89.00.
Available from APS Press 1-800-328-7560 (same place for Disease Compendia).

(back to Table of Contents)


General Dissecting Microscope Specifications

Purpose: to magnify whole specimens for diagnosis.
Magnification:
10X to 40X (or higher) by either individual lens or zoom mechanism. Eye piece lens are usually 10X and then there is a lens which magnifies the image again by 1X to 4X.
Light source: either a built-in or separate light source is necessary but can be purchased separately.
Stage base: Large enough for microscope to be stable.

Vendors:

Arc Micro Optics
http://www.arcmicrooptics.com/
New and used microscope equipment.

The Microscope Store (New Microscopes)
http://www.microscope-store.com/index.php

Daigger - Microscopes
http://www.daigger.com/control/catalog.department?deptId=Microscopes

National Microscope Exchange
http://www.nationalmicroscope.com/

Microscope World
http://www.microscopeworld.com/

Bulb Direct (bulbs/lamps for microscopes, etc.)
http://www.bulbdirect.com/

(back to Table of Contents)


Specifications for a Dissecting Microscope

[Note: The system we are familiar with is the one that follows. There are many brands of microscopes and video cameras, and many vendors of these products that would be suitable for the purposes explained below.]Martin Microscope makes universal microscope adapters for many Sony and Nikon CoolPix digital cameras. They fit any microscope from which an eyepiece or a photoeyepiece can be removed leaving a 23mm or 30mm ID tube, or any microscope which has a standard 1x C-mount adapter.
Martin Microscope digital camera adapters.
Frequently asked questions about MM series adapters

For other cameras not carried by Martin Microscope for which you want a microscope adapter, see adapters for several Canon PowerShot and Nikon CoolPix models byZarf Enterprises and camera adapters specifically for Meiji microscopes.

Vendor:

Arc Micro Optics
1110 Levee Road
Mt. Sterling, KY 40353
Martin Microscope Company
207 South Pendleton Street
Easley, SC 29640
Attention: Phil Hutchinson 859/498-1345 Attention: Robert (Bobby) H. Martin, Jr.
864/242-3424
Item Number Description Quantity
Retail Price
(Feb. 2011)
EMZ-5TR Meiji trinocular stereo (dissecting) microscope (7-45x)
1
~$1550.00
MA502 Super widefield eyepieces (pair) 10x
1
~$150.00
PLS2 StandPole-type stand with dual LED illumination
1
~$750.00
UK Price = contact Phil (Arc Micro) for a substantial discount

A system with which we are not familiar (below).

The Microscope Store
316 Windy Pines Lane
Rocky Mount, Virginia 24151
Toll Free: (877) 409-3556

Item NumberDescriptionQuantity
Price
(Oct. 2011)
OM9949TOmano trinocular stereo (dissecting) microscope (6.5-45x)
1
~$914.00
EyepiecesSuper Wide Field WF10x/22 achromatic coated eyepieces (pair) with molded rubber eyecups
1
included
Pole stand and light sources Pole-type stand with 12V 15W projection variable halogen upper lighting and independent variable 12V 15W base illumination.
1
included

 

Dino-Lite AM3011 USB Microscope
Not your standard dissecting microscope but
magnification/camera apparatus with stand but can be hand-held for mobility.
Cost: $188.00
10x to 50x optical zoom + amp to 200x
Digital image max. resolution is 640 x 480 (0.3 megapixels).
Video playback at 30 frames per second at 640x480.
USB-powered, need a computer or a power source with USB port to run it.
See many Dino-Lite models

 

(back to Table of Contents)


Specifications for a Trinocular Compound Microscope

[Note: The microscope we are familiar with is the one that follows. There are many brands of microscopes and many vendors of these products that would be suitable for viewing specimens on microscope slides.]Martin Microscope makes universal microscope adapters for many Sony and Nikon CoolPix digital cameras. They fit any microscope from which an eyepiece or a photoeyepiece can be removed leaving a 23mm or 30mm ID tube, or any microscope which has a standard 1x C-mount adapter.
Martin Microscope digital camera adapters.
Frequently asked questions about MM series adapters


For other cameras not carried by Martin Microscope for which you want a microscope adapter, see adapters for several Canon PowerShot and Nikon CoolPix models byZarf Enterprises
and camera adapters specifically for Meiji microscopes.

Vendor:

Arc Micro Optics
1110 Levee Road
Mt. Sterling, KY 40353

Martin Microscope Company
207 South Pendleton Street
Easley, SC 29640

Attention: Phil Hutchinson 859/498-1345
arcmicro@mikrotec.com

Attention: Robert (Bobby) H. Martin, Jr.
864-242-3424
bob@martinmicroscope.com
Item Number Description Quantity
Retail Price
(Feb. 2011)
MT 4300L Meiji trinocular compound microscope (40-1000x) with LED illuminator. Field diaphragm; coaxial course & fine adjustment; focusable and centerable condenser carrier; X/Y mechanical stage; quadruple revolving nosepiece; 4X, 10X, 40X, & 100X (oil) SM-plan achromatic objectives; trinocular tube 1X; 30 degree KHW 10X widefield eyepieces; condenser 1.25 NA; lamphousing 6V/30W; conversion filter.
1

$2200.00

contact Phil (Arc Micro) for a substantial discount
---

$1799 at Martin Microscope

You might also want to look into the
Motic BA210 trinocular microscope from
Martin Microscopes

Motic BA210 trinocular compound microscope with EF-N Plan Achromat Infinity Objectives, LED Illumination.

1
$1195.00

(back to Table of Contents)


All-in-One Digital Microscopes

[NOTE: We have been advised by one microscope provider not to recommend these all-in-one microscopes:
See

"JUST SAY NO" TO DIGITAL MICROSCOPES!
 http://www.martinmicroscope.com/nodigitalmicroscopes.htm



(back to Table of Contents)