University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

Forestry Course Descriptions

To view the course description, click on the courses listed below. To view a printable 1-page sample curriculum , click here.

Freshman Year - Fall

Freshman Year - Spring

Math - MA 109 or calculus

 

Inference-Logic I (if needed)

Written - ENG 104

 

Natural Sciences 2 - BIO 103 or 150

Natural Sciences 1 - CHE 104 or 105

 

Social Science 1

GEN 100 Issues in Agriculture

 

Humanities 1

FOR 110 Natural Resource Issues

 

FOR 150 Computer Applications in Natural Resource Professions

 

 

 

Sophomore Year - Fall

 

Sophomore Year - Fall

FOR 200 Basics of Geospatial Technology

 

PLS 366 Fundamentals of Soil Science

FOR 250 Statistics and Measurements I

 

Humanities 2

FOR 219 Dendrology

 

FOR 370 Wildlife Biology and Management

FOR 230 Conservation Biology

 

FOR 280 Forest Policy

FOR 260 Forest Products and Wood Science

 

FOR 240 Forestry and Natural Resource Ethics

 

 

 

Junior Year - Fall

 

Junior Year - Spring Field Semester

FOR 310 Introduction to Forest Health and Protection

 

FOR 355 Forest Fire Control and Use

FOR 320 Forest Valuation and Economics

 

FOR 356 Landscape Assessment

FOR 330 GIS and Spatial Analysis

 

FOR 357 Inventory and Measurements II

FOR 340 Forest Ecology

 

FOR 358 Silvicultural Practices

FOR 350 Silviculture

 

FOR 359 Forest Operations and Utilization

 

 

 

Senior Year - Fall

 

Senior Year - Spring

Elective 1

 

Inference-Logic II (if needed)

Social Science 2

 

Cross-Cultural

FOR 400 Human Dimensions of Forestry and Natural Resources

 

Elective 2

FOR 425 Forest Management

 

FOR 470 Interdependent Natural Res. Issues


Forestry Course Descriptions

Freshman Year
FOR 110 Natural Resource Issues (1 credit hour)
A communication intensive course in which students will learn to research current forestry and natural resource issues, interpret popular press and professional publications, evaluate opposing viewpoints, and discuss issues in a clear, effective and professional manner through oral and written communication.

FOR 150 Computer Applications in Natural Resource Professions (2 credit hours)
Use and application of standard computer software to solve problems. Emphasis will be placed on decision processes and algorithm construction. Additionally, students will learn to construct aesthetic graphs, diagrams, maps and other visual material and will gain experience communicating results in a variety of written formats.

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Sophomore Year
FOR 200 Basics of Geospatial Technology (2 credit hours)
A basic introduction to the various types of maps and their uses, field navigation skills, and map making. The course is heavily field and laboratory based, with an emphasis on hands-on learning and practice. Both traditional technologies, such as compasses, U.S. Geological Survey maps, and aerial photographs as well as newer technologies, such as global positioning systems and geographic information system databases will be employed in carrying out course exercises.

FOR 250 Statistics and Measurements I (3 credit hours)
The application of statistical concepts, computations, and software to forestry sampling and inventory problems. Land, individual tree and timber stand measurement techniques will be covered as will the design and implementation of sampling systems to derive information necessary to meet landowner objectives. Prerequisites: MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 110, and FOR 200.

FOR 219 Dendrology (4 credit hours)
A study of the basic concepts of botany related to woody species and their use, along with basic soil and site characteristics in the identification of trees and forest vegetation. Laboratory, four hours per week.

FOR 230 Conservation Biology (3 credit hours)
The basic history and principles of conservation biology, including diversity, extinction, evolution, and fragmentation. Students will learn the applications of conservation biology to such topics as forest management and wetland management and study the ethical perspectives related to conservation biology, including environmental ethics, deep ecology, and the land ethic.

FOR 260 Forest Products and Wood Science (4 credit hours)
An examination of basic material properties of wood, methods by which it is used, and issues and economic conditions in which domestic and global wood markets operate. Concepts covered include species identification, chemical and mechanical properties and their effect on utilization, utilization technologies and their linkage to silvicultural practices, and affiliated issues such as recycling, product certification, environmental concerns, and alternative products. Laboratory, two hours per week.

FOR 370 Wildlife Biology and Management (4 credit hours)
Applications of basic biological concepts such as physiology, energetics, nutrition, digestive systems, and anatomy to the study of wildlife and wildlife management. In addition to basic wildlife biology, students will also learn taxonomy and identification of wildlife and the principles of wildlife management as well as applied field techniques such as trapping and radio telemetry. Laboratory, three hours per week.

FOR 280 Forest Policy (2 credit hours)
Examine the political process as it relates to the formulation, analysis, evaluation, and implementation of forest policies. Assess the impacts of various policy decisions and employ the policy process to address such forestry issues as urbanization, fragmentation, demographic shifts, invasive species, global competition, forest certification, climate change, and bioenergy.

FOR 240 Forestry and Natural Resource Ethics (2 credit hours)
A study of the key ethical concepts of conservation, preservation, deep ecology, land ethic, spiritualism/religion, and multiple value systems as applied to forestry and natural resource issues. Students will gain an understanding of the ethical dilemmas faced by natural resource professionals, and will be able to identify ways of handling these dilemmas, including application of professional associations’ codes of ethics.

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Junior Year
FOR 310 Introduction to Forest Health and Protection (3 credit hours)
Modular course with one-third devoted to forest entomology, one-third to forest pathology, and one-third to other topics such as abiotic agents and invasive species. Identify various agents that affect forest health, assess the impacts of these agents on forest health, and learn different methods for addressing these impacts. Prerequisites: BIO 103 or BIO 150.

FOR 320 Forest Valuation and Economics
(3 credit hours)
Apply economic concepts to silvicultural practices, land values, and values affiliated with various forest uses. Apply supply and demand concepts and financial computations to identify and quantify economic consequences of a silvicultural actions or management practices. Effects of taxation as well as the societal trend toward monetizing ecosystem services will be discussed. Prerequisites: MA 109 or Calculus.

FOR 330 GIS and Spatial Analysis (3 credit hours)
Principles and operations of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applied to forestry and natural resources. Students will learn to collect necessary field data to create GIS maps and digital spatial data sets, perform basic spatial analysis, and integrate social and economic data to solve spatially related natural resource problems. Prerequisites: MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 150, and FOR 200.

FOR 340 Forest Ecology (4 credit hours)
The study of the forest as a biological community, covering ecosystem concepts such as energy flow, forest nutrition, nutrient cycling, and decomposition. Interrelationships between trees and other organisms comprising the community is also examined through concepts of disturbance, succession, population dynamics, biological and ecosystem diversity, ecosystem management, and ecosystem services. Laboratory, four hours per week. Prerequisites: BIO 103 or BIO 150.

FOR 350 Silviculture (4 credit hours)
A study of ecologically based manipulations of forests to achieve desired management objectives. Develop and apply silvicultural prescriptions and learn the effects of these prescriptions on timber and non-timber forest benefits, forest health and biodiversity, soil, and water resources as well as their effect on broader social, economic, and ecological issues. Laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisites: FOR 219 and FOR 250.

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Junior Year - Spring Field Semester
FOR 355 Forest Fire Control and Use (1 credit hour)
A study of fire related concepts as they relate to trees, soils, landscapes, water quality, hydrology, wildlife, timber products, ecology and silviculture. In completing this course, students will become Red Card Certified through the U.S. Forest Service.

FOR 356 Landscape Assessment (5 credit hours)
Students will learn to assess various landscape types through week-long, in-depth studies of five topic areas, while studying how the topics are interrelated. The topic areas are winter dendrology, wildlife, soils, hydrology, and health and protection. During the module, students will visit sites throughout Kentucky and the region.

FOR 357 Inventory and Measurements II (2 credit hours)
This course teaches students how to conduct forest inventories using a variety of criteria and measurements. Students will use GPS to establish area boundaries and GIS to construct area maps. They will learn how to use inventory data to determine economic value.

FOR 358 Silvicultural Practices (3 credit hours)
A study of the silvicultural practices for altering the forest canopy and regenerating the forest. Students will learn to apply these practices to meet multiple use objectives such as forest products, wildlife, health and protection, watershed, and recreation and develop silvicultural prescriptions.

FOR 359 Forest Operations and Utilization (3 credit hours)
Plan and design timber harvests, mark a stand for harvest, and describe the effects of harvesting. Use herbicides and pesticides to eradicate invasive species, perform tree planting, conduct thinnings, and participate in prescribed burns. Become familiar with major timber utilization technologies and learn to determine value added in converting standing trees into lumber and lumber into finished products.

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Senior Year
FOR 400 Human Dimensions of Forestry and Natural Resources (3 credit hours)
In an issues based format, students will study societal trends and their impact on natural systems, the disconnect between society and nature, wildlife-human interactions, as well as problems related to globalization and urbanization. Prerequisites: Senior Standing or consent of the instructor. This is a writing-intensive (W) course approved to fulfill the upper tier of the graduation writing requirement (GWR). To receive W credit for this course, you must have successfully completed the first-year writing requirement (ENG 104 or its equivalent) and have completed at least 30 hours of coursework. Forestry majors must complete this course and FOR 470 to fulfill the upper tier graduation writing requirement.

FOR 425 Forest Management (4 credit hours)
The principles of sustained yield forest management, management objectives, forest regulation, allowable cut, and timing of timber harvests. Students will identify management objectives for various properties and ownership types and integrate scientific knowledge and both timber and non-timber considerations with landowner objectives to derive management decisions. Laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisites: Completion of the Field Semester or consent of instructor.

FOR 460 Forest Hydrology and Watershed Management (4 credit hours)
Principles and techniques involved in watershed management as it relates to the practice of forestry. Emphasis is placed on understanding the hydrologic cycle, plant-soil interactions from a land-use and landscape perspective, and the need for implementation of forestry best management practices. Laboratory, three hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE 104 or CHE 105, MA 109 or Calculus, FOR 200, and PLS 366.

FOR 470 Interdependent Natural Resource Issues (3 credit hours)
Culmination of the student’s study of public concerns and problems related to natural resources. Working in teams, students will learn to find and verify information on diverse topics, listen to and address public concerns, communicate natural resource information to a wide range of audiences, and be effective professionals in working toward solutions. Prerequisites: Senior Standing. This is a writing-intensive (W) course approved to fulfill the upper tier of the graduation writing requirement (GWR). To receive W credit for this course, you must have successfully completed the first-year writing requirement (ENG 104 or its equivalent) and have completed at least 30 hours of coursework. Forestry majors must complete this course and FOR 400 to fulfill the upper tier graduation writing requirement.

FOR 480 Integrated Forest Resource Management (Capstone)
(5 credit hours)
This is the other capstone course in the forestry curriculum. Students will be presented with a real life management scenario in a forested location in Kentucky. Working in teams, students will collect data, determine management objectives, and develop action plans for managing the forest according to the desires of the owner, subject to realistic legal, economic, ethical, and social constraints. Students will be required to produce a professional management plan and present the plan in a public forum at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: Completion of Field Semester, FOR 425, FOR 460, and Senior Standing.

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