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Gluck Center > About Us > Equine Research Hall of Fame > Rossdale

Photo of Hall of Fame Horse StatueThe Equine Research Hall of Fame — Peter D. Rossdale


 

Photo of Dr. Rossdale
Peter D. Rossdale
England
Dr. Peter D. Rossdale has been a “guiding light’” in the study of equine neonatalogy (newborn and young foals). Working from private practice at his Beaufort Cottage Stables, Newmarket, England, he combines equine practice, research and teaching in an unusual manner - and with great success.
Inducted December 1990.

Working in private practice from his Beaufort Cottage Stables in Newmarket, England, Dr. Peter D. Rossdale has created an unusual environment in which equine research, practice and teaching are combined with great success. Dr. Rossdale has concentrated on equine neonatalogy, revolutionizing various treatments of diseases of the neonatal foal. One of the original organizers of the International Equine Reproduction Symposia (for which he edited the proceedings and has served as chairman), Dr. Rossdale also is editor of the “Equine Veterinary Journal”, an important forum for the publication of quality equine research.

Dr. Rossdale qualified as a veterinary surgeon from the University of London in 1952, and became a member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1953. A thesis on the clinical and laboratory assessment of the newborn foal resulted in the award of Fellowship of the college in 1966, and, in 1973, he also was awarded a Fellowship of the Australian College of Veterinary Sciences. Dr. Rossdale obtained a Ph.D. from Cambridge University in 1984, and received his diploma in Equine Stud Medicine in 1987. He has been a private equine practitioner throughout his career.

While he has published well over 100 papers and eight books on a variety of subjects, contributing significantly in the areas of equine physiology and medicine, Dr. Rossdale’s main research interests have related to late gestation and maladjustment conditions of the newborn foal. He developed a model of equine prematurity and investigated the adaptive responses of the newborn. He applied his early findings on the maladjustment syndrome to developing methods of therapy that are currently used in practice. Dr. Rossdale’s current research includes an investigation of fetal maturity. Perhaps the greatest testament to Dr. Rossdale’s equine research contributions stem from his willingness to collaborate with fellow researchers, and his motivation and encouragement of others - a “mentor” in its truest definition.

Among his other professional activities, Dr. Rossdale has been president of the British Equine Veterinary Association, chairman of the BEVA Trust, served on the Equine Virology Research Foundation Scientific Advisory Committee, and is associate lecturer at Cambridge University. His many awards include the George Fleming Prize, the William Hunting Prize in 1973 (awarded by the “Veterinary Record” to the author of the article judged most useful to practitioners), the John Henry Steel Memorial Medal from the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in 1978, and, in 1987, the Hoochmoor Prize for outstanding achievement in the equine veterinary field.

Maxwell H.Gluck Equine Research Center
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Lexington, Kentucky 40546-0099

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