University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

Welcome to the Master Grazer Educational Program

-an educational program to improve grazing practices in beef, dairy, goat and sheep herds


 

Grazing News Articles

Articles on forages, animals, and grazing systems



Additional Resources

 

Beef
Dairy
Goat
Sheep
Forages
Extension Publications

 

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Master Grazer Educational Program reports to KY Ag Development Fund Board:

2013 Annual Accomplishments
2012 Annual Accomplishments
2011 Annual Accomplishments


 

 

Contacts


Cody Smith

Master Grazer Coordinator
804 W.P. Garrigus Building
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY
40546-0215
(859) 257-7512
Fax: (859) 257-3412
E-mail: cody.smith@uky.edu

Faculty Coordinators:


Dr. Ray Smith

Extension Forage Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (859) 257-3358
Fax: (859) 323-1952  
Email: raysmith1@uky.edu

Dr. Donna Amaral-Phillips

Extension Dairy Cattle Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (859) 257-7542
Fax: (859) 257-7537  
Email: damaral@uky.edu

Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler

Extension Beef Cattle Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (859) 257-2853
Fax: (859) 257-3412  
Email: jeff.lehmkuhler@uky.edu

Dr. Garry Lacefield

Extension Forage Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (270) 365-7541 202 
Fax: (270) 365-2667  
Email: glacefie@uky.edu


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UKAg Video Center

Ultra-High Density Grazing

Feeding soybean hulls to lower fescue toxicity

Greg Reynolds: Kentucky Grazing School

Jim Landis: Kentucky Grazing School

Field Exercise: Kentucky Grazing School

Harvesting Corn for Silage

Testing Forages for Nitrates

Warm-Season Grasses

 

April 2014 Articles

 

Tweaking your Grazing System-Introduction to Managed Grazing

This new UK program will be held on May 10, 2014 in Monroe County. This one-day program is designed to introduce producers to managing grazing systems and the best management practices for utilizing fescue-based forage systems.

 

Heat Stress

Heat stress in cattle can result in decreased weight gain, milk production, and reproductive performance. Heat stress can be increased when grazing endophyte-infected fescue and being worked during the hottest part of the day. Learn how to protect your cattle from heat stress.

 

The Use of Temporary Fence

Many different types of temporary fencing materials are marketed which can make the practice of rotational grazing easier for you. Learn about these type products so you can make the best decision for your operation

 

Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue

Novel Endophyte Tall Fescue is a variety of tall fescue that has the desirable traits of the wild-type endophyte infected fescue, only without the harmful animal side effects.