University of Kentucky College of Agriculture

Welcome to the Master Grazer Educational Program

-an educational program to improve grazing practices in beef, dairy, goat and sheep herds


 

Grazing News Articles

Articles on forages, animals, and grazing systems



Additional Resources

 

Beef
Dairy
Goat
Sheep
Forages
Extension Publications

 

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Master Grazer Educational Program reports to KY Ag Development Fund Board:

2013-2014 Bi-annual Report
2012 Annual Accomplishments
2011 Annual Accomplishments


 

 

Contacts


Cody Smith

Master Grazer Coordinator
804 W.P. Garrigus Building
University of Kentucky
Lexington, KY
40546-0215
(859) 257-7512
Fax: (859) 257-3412
E-mail: cody.smith@uky.edu

Faculty Coordinators:


Dr. Ray Smith

Extension Forage Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (859) 257-3358
Fax: (859) 323-1952  
Email: raysmith1@uky.edu

Dr. Donna Amaral-Phillips

Extension Dairy Cattle Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (859) 257-7542
Fax: (859) 257-7537  
Email: damaral@uky.edu

Dr. Jeff Lehmkuhler

Extension Beef Cattle Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (859) 257-2853
Fax: (859) 257-3412  
Email: jeff.lehmkuhler@uky.edu

Dr. Garry Lacefield

Extension Forage Specialist
University of Kentucky
Phone: (270) 365-7541 202 
Fax: (270) 365-2667  
Email: glacefie@uky.edu


 

UKAg Video Center

Ultra-High Density Grazing

Feeding soybean hulls to lower fescue toxicity

Greg Reynolds: Kentucky Grazing School

Jim Landis: Kentucky Grazing School

Field Exercise: Kentucky Grazing School

Harvesting Corn for Silage

Testing Forages for Nitrates

Warm-Season Grasses

 

February 2015 Articles


Interseeding Clover

Greg Brann has a grazing operation in Southern Kentucky, and unlike many producers he has a diversified herd. He uses cattle and sheep to manage his land. He continues to improve the efficiency of this method and learn new management practices that work for him. Learn more about his operation and what he does that may work in your operation.

 

Controlling Tall Ironweed and Horsenettle: Mike Setters

Weeds can cause the amount of forage available in a pasture to decrease if left unattended. Dr. Green worked with a Lewis County producer to control Tall Ironweed and Horsenettle in his pastures. The producer was very pleased with the outcome, and the results shown just how much weeds can impact the amount of forage in a pasture.

 

Renovating High Traffic Areas

High traffic areas, such as feeding areas, sacrifice lots, alleyways, gateways and waterers, are often bare and muddy this time of year. To slow and reduce serious problems, these areas need to be renovated promptly. Using perennial and annual ryegrass are good options when needing a quick ground cover and not having to take the area out of production for six months.